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Notice: Estyn inspection report of Powys Education Authority published
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The general public told us

78% of respondents said they used the rights of way network all year round come rain or shine

The most popular recreational trails used were Offa's Dyke, Glyndwr's Way and the Wye Valley Walk. 

Walking was the most popular reason for using the network. Running, scouting sessions, mountain biking, fishing, shooting, climbing and taking part in running type events were all listed. 

The key problems were poor way marking and signage, overgrown paths, styles or gates being unsuitable for the user and obstructions like a fallen tree blocking a path etc.

When given a list of priorities and asked to place these in order respondents choose "General maintenance - opening up and maintaining routes and trails including installing gates and stiles and clearing overgrown vegetation" as their first choice closely followed by "Way marking and signage - maintaining and erecting more way markers to help people navigate the network on the public rights of way at entrances to access land " and then "Resolving anomalies - working with landowners to resolve issues around things like access to cul-de-sacs paths etc."

Information posted on the council's website which highlights the routes and the definitive map followed by information boards positioned at the start of or at a half way point of a route were deemed to be the most useful forms of information the team could provide for users of the network.

Creating new local circular routes was considered more important than creating long distance routes as was negotiating with landowners to open up blocked rights of way rather than taking enforcement action at the earliest opportunity. Overwhelmingly respondents also felt that equal priority should be given to recreational trails and other public rights of way.

78% of respondents said they used the rights of way network all year round come rain or shine

The most popular recreational trails used were Offa's Dyke, Glyndwr's Way and the Wye Valley Walk. 

Walking was the most popular reason for using the network. Running, scouting sessions, mountain biking, fishing, shooting, climbing and taking part in running type events were all listed. 

The key problems were poor way marking and signage, overgrown paths, styles or gates being unsuitable for the user and obstructions like a fallen tree blocking a path etc.

When given a list of priorities and asked to place these in order respondents choose "General maintenance - opening up and maintaining routes and trails including installing gates and stiles and clearing overgrown vegetation" as their first choice closely followed by "Way marking and signage - maintaining and erecting more way markers to help people navigate the network on the public rights of way at entrances to access land " and then "Resolving anomalies - working with landowners to resolve issues around things like access to cul-de-sacs paths etc."

Information posted on the council's website which highlights the routes and the definitive map followed by information boards positioned at the start of or at a half way point of a route were deemed to be the most useful forms of information the team could provide for users of the network.

Creating new local circular routes was considered more important than creating long distance routes as was negotiating with landowners to open up blocked rights of way rather than taking enforcement action at the earliest opportunity. Overwhelmingly respondents also felt that equal priority should be given to recreational trails and other public rights of way.

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